10 Publishers Seeking Pitches ($200+ Per Article)


Dear Writers,

One of the best things about Writing Launch, aside from our courses, is the database of publishing opportunities we maintain for our members. Every month we add hundreds of new calls for writers, in addition to the 1,850 publisher listings in our directory.

Below is a sample of some of the latest calls for writers in our database. You’ll notice that each of the listings includes payment rates, and contact information. You’ll note that many of these publishers pay up to $200 per article, and sometimes much more.

Keep in mind that you’ll need to approach these publishers with a high-quality pitch, and you may still need to negotiate payment rates as well.

If you’re a Writing Launch Member, please send us a draft of your pitch, before sending it to the editor. We can often spot simple ways to improve a pitch, and increase the likelihood that you’ll get your pitch accepted.

Note that we’re not currently open for enrollment. If you want access to the full database, you’ll have to join the waiting list here.

If you have any questions, feel free to email us: support@writinglaunch.com

– Jacob Jans

The Balance focuses on “how current events affect personal finances and what’s going on in the consumer finance industry.” They are seeking freelance news reporters and freelance news editors. They pay $250-$500/piece for reporting work. They pay editors an hourly rate which starts at $30/hour. If interested, send an email to writeforus@thebalance.com. To learn more, refer to their editorial director’s Twitter thread. To contact them, refer to this page.

HowStuffWorks is an infotainment website. They are looking for freelance writers who are well-versed in auto or technology. They will pay $85 to $200 per piece. If interested, email freelance@howstuffworks.com. To learn more, refer to their editor’s Tweet. To contact them, refer to this page.

Inclusive Media Solutions LLC provides “media creation, revision, and consulting services to companies, organizations, and individuals who want their media and other materials to be more inclusive.” They are looking for freelance writers to work with their clients. They strongly encourage BIPOC, disabled, and LGBTQIA writers to apply. They will pay at least $0.50 per word. For more information, refer to this Tweet and this page.

Wired UK is a print and online magazine that covers future science, culture, and technology news. Their features editor has tweeted, “Want to pitch a longread before Christmas? Now’s the time! I’m always looking for smart narrative nonfiction pitches in tech, science, and innovation.” According to two payment reports, they paid £1,400 for a longread feature of 4,000 words. Email your pitches to vturk@wired.co.uk. For more details, refer to their features editor’s Tweet and their contributor’s guidelines.

Euronews Travel publishes Europe’s best hidden stories. They are seeking Christmas-themed travel pitches. They commission a wide range of content types e.g. features, listicles, and op-eds. They pay €100 to €150 per piece. For more information, refer to their Tweet and pitch form.

OpenDemocracy is a global media organization that covers world affairs, ideas, and culture. They are seeking “stories that track the backlash against women’s and LGBTIQ rights, document the resistance or profile feminist media in the Eurasia region.” They accept pitches for comment and analysis pieces (800-900 words), features (1,200-1,400 words), investigations, first-person accounts, and photo essays. They commission 2 articles per month and prioritize articles by women, trans, and non-binary contributors. Rates are £100 to £350 per piece. There is no deadline, but writers should try to submit by the end of January. If interested, send pitches in English, Russian or Georgian to inge.snip@opendemocracy.net. For more information, refer to this Twitter thread and this page.

Insider is a website that shares all the adventures that life has to offer. Their lifestyle and entertainment editor has tweeted, “Currently looking for entertainment analysis pitches. Do you want to highlight the biggest mistake in “Gilmore Girls”? or break down Dumbledore’s biggest failures? or explain why exactly Draco Malfoy is so beloved yet so absent? Email me!” “Primarily looking for pitches tied to trending/popular shows and movies (like Twilight, The Queen’s Gambit, High School Musical, Gilmore Girls, Harry Potter, The Office, Friends, Home Alone…). Rates start at about $130 to $140 for not-too lengthy entertainment analysis like this. If interested, send pitches to pdifiore@insider.com. To learn more, refer to their editor’s Twitter thread. To contact them, refer to this page.

The Guardian is a British news and media website. Their deputy opinion editor has tweeted, “I’m taking pitches for a series loosely titled ‘The year that changed me’ – serious or fun. Did you realise how much you could sacrifice for others or how selfish you are? Did you make a big life decision or appreciate the little things more? I’m open to ideas!” They pay £310 per 1,000 words. For details, refer to their editor’s Tweet and their freelance charter.

Life & Thyme is a print magazine and website that specializes in culinary storytelling and food journalism. They are looking for pitches for “stories that explore topics related to parenting while working in the food industry.” They are “especially looking for pitches about parents with children at home who are working an on-site food or hospitality job during Covid.” Pay is $200 to $400 per piece. To learn more, refer to this Twitter thread and this page.

Transformations is “a project of the narrative storytelling initiative at Arizona State University and a publishing channel of the Los Angeles Review of Books.” They have tweeted, “Holidays can evoke strong emotions & poignant experiences—even life-altering ones. Or they can be disasters. Do you have a transformative holiday story? We’re accepting submissions of up to 600 words on the topic: ‘Holidays?’” Pay will be $75 per story. Email your submissions to transformations@asu.edu. For more information, refer to this Twitter thread and this page.

Deadline: December 13th, 2020

Case Study: How I Established My Freelance Writing Career


By Vanessa Le

When I joined Writing Launch, I was clueless about writing. Oh, I knew that I wanted to write and that I had something to say; in fact, I had written a couple of short articles and sent them to friends and family. However, I had no idea where to focus my time and energy. I had no idea how many words to aim for in an article. And I had no idea where to get them published.

Today, just six months later, I am a happily published author. I have good relationships with the editors of two different freelance magazines and have a few other places that I am investigating for the future. I don’t write a lot – having four kids age five and under makes that rather impossible – but I write as a late-night/early-morning/while the kids are in the sandbox kind of hobby.

Writing Launch has some very helpful advice for beginning writers: Find your niche. Perhaps you (like me) are scrolling through pages of magazines that are looking for freelance writers, but coming up blank. There are lots of interesting writing opportunities available! But what do you want to write? End of the world fantasy? Maybe you can read it, but are not detail-oriented enough to write more than five words in that genre. Politics? Perhaps you know exactly where you stand, but don’t have the up-to-date knowledge to write compellingly in that area. So, try thinking about it from a different angle. What have you already written? What do you already know? What types of things do you enjoy reading? What are you passionate about? For me, the answer was obvious: Christian thought and practice. But I did not think I could get paid for writing about that.

Once you have established your niche, you need to identify the publications with which you want to work. Again, Writing Launch has great advice: Start with a publication very familiar to you, preferably one to which you already subscribe.

Having figured out my niche, I began to think about a Christian magazine (The Outlook) that I grew up reading. Although I was not a subscriber when I began writing, I had been asking my mom to pass her old copies of the magazine on to me.  I really enjoyed their content and style and was very familiar with them. The first articles that I had written were very short (about 700 words), whereas the typical Outlook article is much longer (1800 – 2300 words).

I initially submitted an article to a different publication based on a recommendation from a friend. They kindly asked me to revise, improve, and expand it, and also sent me their list of suggestions for beginning writers. After I did those things, I realized that my revised article felt like it would fit the content of The Outlook very well. So, I visited their website, and again, using the advice from Writing Launch (to be really familiar with what the editors want), I basically memorized their list of requirements. The Outlook does not require you to send them a pitch; rather, they assume that anyone interested in writing for them will be well versed in Reformed Christianity. The Outlook does not contract out its writing; it is done by freelance writers, and as a writer you can decide how often you want to submit articles to them. The Outlook is perfect for my interest and availability as a writer since it is published six times a year.

When you want to get established as a regular writer with your favorite magazine, expertise is your best friend. Make sure that you know what you are talking about.  Make sure that your article fits its content and style, and that it compelling addresses topics that the editor wants to include. The editor of The Outlook responded to my first article with: “I’m pleased to say we would love to publish your article. It is a very good article.” Aim for prompting that kind of response. Your first interaction with an editor is especially important: Keep him or her interested and engaged, make them excited to see your name pop up in the inbox.

There is one more key to success: get a small group of people who will be your proofreaders. Preferably, your group will include people who are also interested and passionate about the subjects about which you are writing. You might be surprised at who will end up being a good proofreader. 

My list includes a 19-year-old former student and fellow author; a friend with a doctorate in music; my pastor; a seminary professor who teaches writing; and a bunch of my family members. Good proofreaders catch those middle-of-the-night typos, tell you when you missed an important connection, or, as in my case, add and subtract punctuation in all sorts of places.

Oh, and one more thing: if your proofreaders tell you to take out your favorite point, do us all a favor and take it out. If someone is giving their time and effort to make you a better writer, the least you can do is take their advice.

Each person’s story as a writer will be different. Each person has unique knowledge and experiences. If you start with your passions and interest, submit your writing to a familiar publication, follow their writing guidelines, establish yourself as an expert, and get good feedback from others, you are well on your way to running from the mailbox yelling, “I just got paid to write!”


Vanessa Le is a freelance writer and Writing Launch student. She’s based in Orlando, Florida.

These Publishers Pay $1,000 Per Article


Dear Writers,

One of the best things about Writing Launch is our members only database of over 1,850 publishers. It is easily searchable, and organized by category.

Below is a list of ten publishers in the database that pay up to $1,000 or more per article.

If you want access to the full database, you’ll have to join the waiting list here.

Please make sure to carefully study each publication before sending a pitch.

Also – if you’re a paid member of Writing Launch, please send us a draft pitch before you send it to the publishers. We often can suggest small changes that make your pitch much more likely to be accepted. As a member, we’ll give you feedback on as many pitches as you want, as part of your membership. (Of course, in addition to our in-depth courses.)

If you have any questions, feel free to email us: support@writinglaunch.com

– Jacob Jans

Truly*Adventurous is a digital magazine that publishes longform stories by established and powerful nonfiction writers. About the kind of stories that they publish, they say: “Unlike most magazines, we have no topical mandates and couldn’t care less about chasing the news cycle. We tell incredible true stories by amazing writers. That’s it. We’ve published a lot of true-crime and real-life horror—subjects we love—but we also publish stories about wild adventures, clashing cultures, devilish mysteries, and unsung heroes.” According to their editor, payment starts at $1,000 plus a revenue share model. Send your pitches to team@trulyadventure.us. Learn more about them here and contact them here.

Roadtrippers Magazine “celebrates road culture, Americana, and the great outdoors.” They are always looking for new contributors to tell stories from the North American road. They are currently only accepting pitches focused on the United States and Canada. They typically pay $250 to $1,000 based on word count. Details can be found here.

GIA (Grantmakers in the Arts) Reader is a publication that is dedicated to the field of arts funding. They publish 3 times a year. Their content is focused on 4 primary areas which are “racial equity, arts education, capitalization, and support for individual artists.” They welcome “submissions of previously unpublished content of various lengths, ranging from short reflections to long-form articles to poetry.” They pay $150 to $350 for articles of 500 to 2,000 words, $350 to $1,000 for articles of 2,000 to 4,000 words, and at least $50 per poem. For details, read their submission guidelines.

Bridal Guide Magazine offers everything that is needed to plan a wedding. They offer the latest wedding trends, registry advice, honeymoon information, real wedding photos, beauty tips, and more. According to one payment report, they paid $1,000 for a 2,000-word story. Keep in mind that this is a publication that may have been affected by the pandemic, as expensive weddings are currently much less common. Contact them here.

The Correspondent is “an online platform for unbreaking news, committed to collaborative, constructive, ad-free journalism.” They accept story pitches. They focus on stories that are “transnational, collaborative and constructive.” They pay $0.40 per word which means that writers will get $600 for 1,500 words and $1,000 for 2,500 words. Details here.

Faith & Leadership is a biweekly, online magazine that is a learning resource for Christian leaders. They are always seeking new writers and stories. Their feature articles are 1,500-2,000 words, essays are 800-1,000 words, and Q&As are 1,000-1,500 words. They pay $1,500 for feature articles and $300 for essays. They also pay for mileage, parking, and other expenses. For details, read their submission guidelines.

LiisBeth is a “a reader and community supported zine that examines entrepreneurship, start-up culture, and the innovation eco-system through a progressive feminist lens.” They pay up to $2,000 for articles. To learn more, read their submission guidelines.

Legion Magazine bills itself as Canada’s military history magazine. They cover military history, military and veterans affairs, policing issues, issues of concern to senior citizens, health, recreation, humour and current affairs of interest to a national audience. Payment ranges from $150 to $1,200, plus 10 percent if they post the article on their website. Query first.  To learn more, read their submission guidelines.

Writer’s Digest is a widely-read and well-respected magazine about the art of writing. They accept both manuscript submissions and queries for articles that “inform, instruct, and inspire” readers. Writers can submit to any of their departments, including their “5-Minute Memoir,” “Reject a Hit,” and writing technique sections. They pay between 30 and 50 cents a word for articles up to 2,400 words ($720-$1,200), and they also work with a 25% kill fee. To learn more, read their submission guidelines.

Kitplanes Magazine is a magazine of kit and amateur-built aircraft construction. Contributions are mostly by aircraft builders and recognized experts active in the field. They accept articles on all phases of aircraft construction, from basic design, to flight trials, to construction technique in wood, metal and composite. They also review and analyze products and services related to amateur-built and kit aircraft construction. Short, focused technical articles are always welcome. Query first. Word count: About 2,000 for major features, unspecified for others. Pay: $250-$1,000. Details here.

One Quick Tip to Increase Email Response Rates


Email continues to be one of the most necessary and powerful tools for writers.

In this video, Ian shares one quick tip for increasing the chance that you’ll get a response to your emails. When sending a pitch to an editor, this little tip can help you increase your bottom line, by increasing the chance that your pitch will be accepted.

Also – in the video, Ian mentions his pitch template. Grab a free copy here.

These Publishers Are Seeking Pitches…


Dear Writers,

At Writing Launch we have a members-only database full of publishing opportunities. Hundreds of new calls for writers are posted every week, in addition to our database of over 1800 publishers.

Here’s a sample of some of the latest listings in the database.

Keep in mind that these are freelance opportunities. There is a huge difference between submitting your writing to a literary journal, a manuscript publisher, and a magazine. If you don’t know the difference, read this article!

Also – note that we’re not currently open to new members. If you are currently a member of Writing Launch, please send us a draft of pitch, so we can give you a critique before you send it out. This is one of the ways we like to help you out; and our critiques often make a big difference, in terms of getting your pitch accepted. (We often spot small changes that make a big difference.)

Let me know if you have any questions.

– Jacob Jans

Huck Magazine celebrates and explores “independent culture – people and movements that paddle against the flow.” Their US editor is always seeking “pitches on all things art/music/subculture/youth activism/politics.” They pay £120 to £200 for interviews and profiles, they pay more for a cover feature. They pay £225 and up for larger pieces. Send your pitches to jonathan@tcolondon.com. To learn more, refer to this Tweet and their submissions guidelines.

SPIN features music news, album reviews, interviews, concert photos, and more. Their contributing editor is accepting pitches. According to one payment report, they paid $0.25 per word for a 600-word piece. If interested, send your pitches to ryan.reed@spin.com. Read their contributing editor’s Tweet here and learn more about them here.

Junkee is an Australian pop culture website that covers TV, film, music, gaming, technology, politics, web stuff, and more. Their Gender Euphoria column is “always looking for trans & gender diverse writers to write about good news stories/ fun stuff & entertainment/ things important to the trans community.” They pay $200 AUD per piece. If interested, email your pitches to plenton@junkeemedia.com. For details, refer to their editor’s Tweet. To learn more about them, refer to this page.

The Frisc is an online publication that shares stories about San Francisco. They are accepting pitches. They cover San Francisco’s big civic issues, for example, housing, homelessness, transportation, street safety, schools, local businesses, etc. Rates start at $0.33 per word. To learn more, refer to this page.

High Country News is a non-profit magazine covering the Western US. Their associate editor is seeking original personal essays and perspectives (800 to 1,600 words). They will pay about $0.50 per word. For details, refer to this Tweet and their submission guidelines.

The Breakdown is an online mental health magazine. They are “looking for someone from the US who has tried therapy apps before, to try a few sessions of an online counselling service (free).” Pay is $70. If you would like to write this, then DM their founder and editor on Twitter. To learn more, refer to their founder and editor’s Tweet and this page.

Sustainability Action Network is currently seeking stories about “active, positive change” in terms of climate change and the environment. They pay £100 per 800-1200 words. To learn more, read this, as well as the editor’s Tweet.

HelloGiggles is a positive community for women. They are seeking pitches for their series, How I Bought That. The series focuses on the process of making a big or unique purchase. Pay will be around $100. Send your story pitches to raven.ishak@meredith.com. To learn more, refer to their senior lifestyle editor’s Tweet. To read How I Bought That, refer to this page.   

Mental Floss is a media brand that offers interesting facts, quizzes, trivia, and brain teasers to the audience. They are always seeking new voices to write about the diverse verticals they cover, “whether that’s history, science, entertainment, language, pop culture, art, or beyond.” They accept pitches for lists and features. For lists, their rates start at $150. For short features of 500 words, their rates start at $125 and for longer features, rates start at $200. To learn how to send them a pitch, visit this page.

Science for the People is a magazine and website dedicated to “building and promoting social movements and political struggles around progressive and radical perspectives on science and society.” They welcome pitches from anyone who can offer their readers “reporting, analysis, or perspective on the struggle to ensure science serves the people, not profit.” They pay $100 for short pieces (600 to 1,000 words) which are often published via SftP Online. They pay $200 for slightly longer pieces like reviews, columns, and other articles of 1,200 to 1,500 words, and $250 for feature-length stories of 2,000 words and above. To learn more, refer to their submissions page

Inverse covers science, innovation, entertainment, gaming, and the mind and body. According to their senior entertainment editor, they pay $0.50 per word. Send your pitches to pitch@inverse.com. To contact them, refer to this page.

These Publishers Pay $1 Per Word


Dear Writers,

One of the best things about Writing Launch, aside from our courses, is the database of publishing opportunities we maintain for our members. Every month we add hundreds of new calls for writers, in addition to the 1850 publisher listings in our directory.

Below is a sample of some of the latest calls for writers in our database. You’ll notice that each of the listings includes payment rates, and contact information. Many of these pay $1 per word; some pay less, some pay more.

Keep in mind that you’ll need to approach these publishers with a high-quality pitch, and you may still need to negotiate payment rates as well. (This is the type of thing we help our members work on.)

Also – note that we’re not currently open for enrollment. If you want access to the full database, you’ll have to join the waiting list here.

If you have any questions, feel free to email us: support@writinglaunch.com

– Jacob Jans

Popular Mechanics is a source for tech, science, math, aerospace, military, and auto news. They are looking for new writers. They pay $100-$400 for a news/service story and $0.50-$2.00 per word for a feature. If interested, send “news (studies/trends), service (how-to/explainers), and feature ideas” about science, military, aviation, space, math, and more to andrew.daniels@hearst.com. For details, refer to this Tweet. To learn more about them, refer to this page.

Massive Science is a community of scientists that shares fascinating and true stories about science. Their senior editor has tweeted, “CALL FOR PITCHES: Massive Science and I are working with Pioneer Works to create strange new writing about science. Are you a writer specializing in creative non-fiction essays about science? I’d like to hear about it.” “I have no particular subjects in mind, but I’m always into stuff about THE FUTURE of stuff, whatever that means to you. Genetic engineering, urban design, space exploration, geology, oceanography, evolution. But, strange stories about THE PAST OF SCIENCE are also welcome.” Pay is $0.75 to $1.00 per word. If interested, DM their senior editor on Twitter or send an email to dan@massivesci.com. Read their senior editor’s Twitter thread here. Learn more about Massive Science here and Pioneer Works here.

Drive Magazine is a lifestyle magazine by Subaru. It’s mailed to Subaru owners but it’s not about cars. They cover travel, fitness, health, cooking, and more. Their readers love outdoor adventure, nature, animals, healthy cooking, and connecting with friends or family. They are seeking pitches this week for their Summer and Fall 2021 print issues and for their online features. They pay $1 per word. To learn more, refer to this Tweet. To visit their website, click here.

LeapsMag is an online magazine about “scientific innovation, ethics, and the future of humanity.” Their editor-in-chief has tweeted, “I’m currently taking pitches for Dec stories for LeapsMag. Features at the intersection of life sciences, medicine, biotech/ethics/future of humanity.” They pay an average of $1 per word. Email your pitches to kira@goodinc.com. Read their editor-in-chief’s Tweet here and contact them here.  

Inverse covers science, innovation, entertainment, gaming, and the mind and body. Their senior entertainment editor has tweeted, “Call for freelance pitches. I’m looking for articles for Inverse’s entertainment section through the end of the year: Essays on timely old sci-fi movies ($100-200); Smart or unique analysis/reporting on Mandalorian and WandaVision ($150-300); High profile interviews ($300+).” Email your pitches to jacob@inverse.com. Read their senior entertainment editor’s Tweet here and contact them here.

The Daily Dot is “the ultimate destination for original reporting on internet culture and life online.” Their politics and tech team is seeking pitches. They want “reported features at the intersection of the internet, politics, and technology.” They will pay $100 to $500 per piece. If interested, DM their senior politics and tech editor on Twitter or email dcovucci@thedailydot.com. To learn more, refer to their editor’s Twitter thread. To contact them, refer to this page.

Current Affairs is a magazine of political commentary and analysis. They are accepting pitches. They don’t want first-timers to be afraid to pitch them. Their main articles for the print edition are around 3,000 to 4,500 words while online articles are around 1,200 to 2,400 words. They pay $300 for print articles and $200 for online articles. To learn more, refer to this Tweet and their writers guide. To submit a pitch, refer to this page.

Mic is a digital news company that caters to millennials. Their innovation editor is always seeking “pitches on all things climate/sustainability/activism/the future, and the ways those things intersect with culture.” According to one payment report, they paid $0.13 per word. If interested, email jonathan.smith@team.mic.com. To learn more, refer to their innovation editor’s Tweet. To contact them, refer to this page.

The features editor of Vice UK has tweeted, “Hey if you have any ideas for reported news features, investigations etc. that could work for Vice World News then send me a pitch. Mainly UK stories but with one eye beyond these borders too.” For reported pieces, the rates of Vice World News start at a minimum of 50 cents/word. If interested, email your pitches to simon.childs@vice.com. To learn more, refer to this Tweet and this page.

Huellas is “a bilingual magazine of longform narrative writing.” They are seeking “pitches for Latin American inertia stories.” You can write in whatever language you feel more comfortable with (English or Spanish, they could maybe accommodate Portuguese) and they will translate it to Spanish/English. They will pay $250 per piece (3,000-5,000 words). They are not accepting fiction submissions at the moment. Email your pitches to huellas.mag@gmail.com. For more information, refer to this Twitter thread and their call for pitches.

HuffPost Personal is a personal stories section in HuffPost. Their editorial director is always seeking smart and unique personal essays. People with/from diverse backgrounds/experiences are especially welcome to pitch. They will pay $125 per piece (800 to 2,000 words). Email your pitches to noah.michelson@huffpost.com. Read their editorial director’s Tweet here and their pitch guide here. Read HuffPost Personal’s pieces here.

HelloGiggles is a positive community for women. They are “looking to connect with writers who are choosing not to empathize with Trump supporters right now for an essay.” They are also “looking for biracial mothers to talk about what it means to have a biracial Vice President in the White House for their child.” Rates start at $150. Send your pitches to raven.ishak@meredith.com. For details, refer to their senior lifestyle editor’s Twitter thread. To learn more about them, refer to this page.

These Publishers Pay $250 Per Article


Dear Writers,

One of the best things about Writing Launch is our members only database of over 1850 publishers. It is easily searchable, and organized by category.

Below is a list of ten publishers in the database that pay up to $250 or more per article.

If you want access to the full database, you’ll have to join the waiting list here.

If you have any questions, feel free to email us: support@writinglaunch.com

– Jacob Jans

Immerse is a publication (produced in partnership with the MIT Open DocLab) that sparks creative dialogue around emerging forms of non-fiction media (VR, XR, AR, video games, interactive media, and beyond). According to their editor, they pay $250 per piece (standard length 1,200 words). If interested, contact them at editor@immerse.news. Details here and here.

Self covers health and wellness. They are always seeking new writers and are especially excited to work more frequently with BIPOC, LGBTQ+ writers and writers from other marginalized groups. They want stories that will help improve personal or public health. Their main categories of focus are health, fitness, food, beauty, love, and lifestyle. Their rates start at $300 for stories with minimal to no reporting, $400 for reported service stories, and $800 for features. To learn how to pitch them a story, visit this page.

Heated is a food publication from Mark Bittman (a food journalist, author, and television personality) and Medium (an online publishing platform). Their “goal is to showcase the links between food and just about everything else: agriculture, politics, history, and labor; culture and cooking; identity, family, and love.” They are actively seeking pitches. According to one payment report, they paid $0.83 per word for a 1200-word feature. To learn more, visit this page.

The News Station is a national alt-weekly that covers the war on drugs, prison and criminal justice reform, CBD, the innovations in health and wellness, culture, politics, and more. They welcome pitches from freelancers. Regarding the rates, their managing editor tweeted: “my interns get $75 for short pieces explaining new science/research, then about $150 for a researched news piece or $200 for features; then we’ll usually be $250 for day of, non-breaking news pieces, and as much as $500 though usually around $300 to $400 for features.” Learn more here. Read their styleguide and journalistic standards here.

Science for the People is a magazine and website dedicated to “building and promoting social movements and political struggles around progressive and radical perspectives on science and society.” They welcome pitches from anyone who can offer their readers “reporting, analysis, or perspective on the struggle to ensure science serves the people, not profit.” They pay $100 for short pieces (600 to 1,000 words) which are often published via SftP Online. They pay $200 for slightly longer pieces like reviews, columns, and other articles of 1,200 to 1,500 words, and $250 for feature-length stories of 2,000 words and above. To learn more, refer to their submissions page

What To Expect is a pregnancy and parenting brand. They offer preconception, pregnancy, and parenting advice. According to their managing editor, they pay $250 to $400 per piece. To contact them, refer to this page.

Pipette Magazine is an independent print magazine about natural wine. They publish 3 times a year. They are looking for pitches about natural wine from experienced writers. They pay $200 to $350. For details, refer to their editor and publisher’s Twitter post. To contact them, refer to this page.

ALL ARTS is a multimedia platform that covers visual art, theater, dance, film, music, literature, and more. They are seeking journalists who cover theater, film, music, visual art, fashion, and/or TV. Their pay varies based on the story type, but their minimum threshold for a non-reported 400-word post is $250. For details, refer to this Twitter post. For their contact information, refer to this page.

Digital Trends is a website that covers all things tech. They offer the latest news, reviews, deals, and sneak peeks. Their gaming section editor is seeking “freelance gaming writers to cover news and report on gaming issues.” Their rates start at $50 for news pieces and $250 for reviews/ features. For details, read this Twitter post. To learn more about them, refer to this page.

Columbia Insight is an online publication that “publishes news and feature stories about the Columbia River Basin environmental challenges, the people and places affected, and the successes.” According to their Twitter post, their starting rate for freelancers for a 750 to 1,000 word article is $250. They top out at $350. To contact them, refer to this page.

These Publishers Pay $1 Per Word


Dear Writers,

At Writing Launch, we have a members only database of 1,860 publishers and counting. We work very hard to maintain this database, updating it every week with new publishers.

Here’s a select list of ten publishers from our database that pay up to $1.00 per word, and sometimes more.

If you’d like access to the full database, you can join the waiting list here.

– Jacob Jans

The Fuller Project is a global nonprofit newsroom that reports on issues affecting women in the US and abroad. They raise awareness, expose injustices, and spur accountability. They are always seeking stories on issues that affect women in the US and globally. According to payment reports, they pay $1 per word. If interested, send your pitches to pitch@fullerproject.org. To learn more, refer to their pitch guide.

Enemy Magazine is a print magazine that focuses on “abuses of power in news deserts and underrepresented communities across America.” According to their founder, they pay $1 per word. Send pitches to pitch@enemymagazine.com or jake@enemymagazine.com. Visit their website here.

Eating Well focuses on all aspects of food and nutrition. Their motto is “Where Good Taste Meets Good Health,: and their articles reflect that. Their pieces take a scientific approach to food and provide advice on healthy eating. They’ve posted a list of columns that are suitable for freelancers, and they pay up to $1 per word. To learn more, read their submission guidelines.

EdTech Magazine explores “technology and education issues that IT leaders and educators face when they’re evaluating and implementing a solution for K-12 and Higher Ed.” They are always seeking new writing talent. According to their associate editor, they pay $0.50 to $1.00 per word for articles of 800 to 1,200 words. To learn more, refer to this page.

Increment is a quarterly “print and digital magazine about how teams build and operate software systems at scale.” Each issue of the magazine focuses on a new theme. They welcome pitches from writers. Right now, they are especially interested in APIs. According to one payment report, they paid $1.00 per word for a 3,000-word piece. Read their Tweet here. Pitch them a story here.

Zora is Medium’s online publication about women of color. Their topic areas include: “current events, culture, identity, race, justice, equality, work/life, family, self, sexuality, parenting, psychology, spirituality, career, friendship, aging, habits, love and dating, body image, trauma and recovery, caregiving, hobbies… and the list goes on.” According to payment reports, they pay up to $1.00 per word. Writers can send pitches to their editor-in-chief at vanessa@medium.com. To learn more about them, refer to this page.

Input is a tech publication that is committed to “offering a fresh perspective on the devices, creators, trends, and ideas that are changing our world.” According to their contributing features editor, they are seeking stories at the intersection of technology and culture. They pay $0.33 to $1.00 per word for features. View their website here.

Experience is an online magazine by Northeastern University. They welcome “pitches for reported stories that examine how experience is driving change in industry and society — and inspiring solutions to global problems.” According to one payment report, they paid $1.00 per word for a 600-word piece. To pitch, refer to this page.

Plate Magazine explores the culinary world to meet the most innovative chefs of the industry and uncover interesting food and drink ideas. Each issue of the magazine focuses on a singular culinary theme. According to payment reports, they pay $1.00 per word. To learn more, visit this page.

Forge is Medium.com’s home for personal development articles. They cover productivity, self-improvement, optimization, personal progress, mindfulness, and creativity. They don’t specify pay rates, though similar Medium publications pay up to $1 per word or more. To learn more, read their guide to pitching.

Case Study: How Ian Chandler Helped Me Get My First Publication


By Kyle Geoffrey Uy

“Freelance writing is something anyone can do,” said freelance writer Ian Chandler in his webinar. As someone just starting out, those words gave me hope. I didn’t know anything about where to begin, so I watched this free webinar to learn more.

The knowledge Ian gave us viewers paved the way to landing my first paid gig.

I had no portfolio, and I had never been paid for writing. If you’re someone in the same situation, you can definitely score a first paid gig too. This is how I got mine.

Online Publications

The webinar included a PDF called “The 2020 Paid Publishing Guidebook.” (Editor’s note: You can grab a free copy here.) This e-book is a directory of online publications that pay for articles. Ian’s advice for beginners was to look for online publications, pitch them an article idea, and see if they want to work with you. I searched the e-book for websites that covered my interests.

 I spotted geeknative.com–a website for table-top game resources and news. I am an avid table-top gamer myself and I had an idea for an article. I found the email address for the editors and sent them a pitch.

My Pitch

Good day Geek Native,

I have an article idea I know readers of your blog will love, and I’d be honored if you’d consider it for publication on your website.


My 750-word article “The Fundamentals of Being A Dungeon Master” will discuss tips for beginning DMs who may feel overwhelmed when running a quest for the first time. I will detail the core fundamentals of a quest that the DM should focus on to keep the game fun and flowing for all players without having to worry about everything the in the Player’s Handbook or Dungeon Master’s Guide.

A little about me: My name is Kyle Uy. I’m from a small town outside of San Francisco. I’m a huge fan of Dungeons and Dragons and 90% of my experience with the game over the last five years has been as the Dungeon Master. I thoroughly enjoy the storytelling and imaginative process that is Dungeons and Dragons. I hope to share knowledge and help anyone I can with the understanding of the game so they can share in that passion too.

I can have this article ready by June 5th, 2020. Does that sound good to you?

Thank you again for your consideration.

Sincerely,
Kyle Uy

Geek Native

One of the editors for geeknative.com emailed me the next day. He said he would commission my article at $0.08 a word at a maximum of 1000 words for a total of $80 (a little less after some fees). Included in their offer were some questions about advertising, an agreement that payment would be through Paypal, and an extension on the deadline to June 10th.

Writing

With those terms settled, I started writing the article. This was my first writing assignment since my thesis in college three years ago. I could feel the rust as I scrapped together my first draft. I keep a blog, but again, I’ve never been paid to write. I wondered if the editors would read my submission, deem it unworthy of publication, and then cancel our agreement.

Still, I was fueled with excitement for writing about Dungeons and Dragons. I was a happy geek, typing away at his computer about something I really enjoyed. On June 10th, I submitted my 1000-word article and I received my payment. The article was published on the website a few days later.

The Numbers Game

Now, I warn you that this “success” was borne out of many misfires along the way. My pitch to geeknative.com was one of about ten pitches that I sent out to different publications. Some of these publications were from the e-book, some were found through my own internet searches. These other pitches were responded to with silence, the request for a whole article before the agreement to publish, the editor respectfully saying “no”, or the offer of writing for exposure only. All were fair responses; I was just looking for something different.

Business philosopher Jim Rohn once said, “Success is a numbers game”. I believe that success with freelance writing is a game of numbers and skill. Your ability to write a promising pitch for a publication is crucial. With my limited experience, my advice is: just keep trying and keep improving—keep believing that every “no” is leading you closer to “yes”.

Make it Fun

Writing my article was the easiest part of the whole process. Looking for publications, pitching articles, waiting for responses, and networking with people are all parts of this new venture that are uncomfortable for me personally. If you can relate, I would say to try to make this process of freelance writing fun for yourself–especially the writing part. You do this by writing what you want to write about. You also do this by being respectful and transparent with the people you are communicating with along the way.

Freelance Writing

I found that there are countless writing opportunities and a vast array of topics that need writers like us. If you’re interested in something, chances are you can get paid to write about it. This silly article about Dungeons and Dragons is my excuse to call myself a freelance writer–but I plan on carrying that as far as I can.

Get Going

If you’re stuck on where to begin, try to watch the free webinar with Ian Chandler. It’s the “Preview the No B.S. Course on Freelance Writing”. The resources and knowledge provided there will be a great jumpstart to your search for paid writing jobs. If not though, use the internet to find websites looking for articles, send them a pitch–rinse and repeat. I hope my story helped someone for the road ahead. Remember: “Freelance writing is something anyone can do.” I took those words to heart–I think you should too.

New Freelancer Writers: Don’t Make This Simple Mistake


As an editor of an online publication, as well as through working with our Writing Launch members for years, there is a big misconception that I regularly see new freelance writers make. It’s based on a simple misunderstanding.

Here’s the deal: There’s a huge difference between pitching an article, applying for a writing job, sending a proposal to a business, and submitting creative writing for publication.

Let me be super clear: The process is extremely different for those four categories. If you want to succeed in any of those categories, it is extremely important that you understand the distinctions.

At Writing Launch, we get into the nitty-gritty details of this with our members on a regular basis. However, here’s a quick overview.

First, applying for a traditional writing job, as you know, usually requires a cover letter and a resume. This is pretty standard stuff that most people know about.

However, if you want to get published in a magazine (or a blog), then absolutely never, ever include a cover letter and a resume. Just don’t do it!

That’s simply not how the process works. Instead, write a clear and concise pitch and send it to an editor – usually in the body of an email. (A pitch, in short, is an idea for an article you would like to write.)

When you’re sending a pitch, don’t write the article ahead of time. Instead, you’re simply proposing an idea. Only start writing once you have the go ahead from the editor.

If you’re looking to publish creative writing – perhaps short stories or poetry – then you almost always will be sending a completed piece ahead of time. It is extremely rare to be “commissioned” to write a creative piece. Usually, when submitting creative writing, you send a very short email, with the writing attached to the email in a separate document. The body of the email should simply thank the editors for their time, and also include a short 20 to 30 word bio.

Note: Whether you’re pitching a piece of creative writing, or an article for a publication, always check to see if they have a submissions guidelines page. If they do, read it very carefully!

What if you’re proposing freelance work for a business? This is a more complex process, as you are, in essence, selling a product. You need to think of this as a marketing exercise. A general rule of thumb is to focus on understanding the person you are selling to so that you can give them a custom solution that meets their specific needs. You can then approach them with your solution. The more accurate your understanding of their needs, the more likely you are to get a positive response.

Here’s something all of these categories have in common: Rejection.

One of the best things you can do for your freelance writing career is embrace rejection. Every successful writer I know has earned mountains of rejections from a wide variety of sources. Every time you get a rejection, simply remind yourself that even the most famous authors got many rejections. It’s just part of the process.

If you want personal help working on any of the topics in this article, then I encourage you to join the Writing Launch Waiting List here.